Rehabilitation of Nagaur Fort – Minakshi Jain

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The project by Architect Minakshi Jain, Ahemdabad, has been included in 2013 Cycle Shortlisted Projects by Aga Khan Awards for Architecture.

Text: akdn.org
Photographs: Minakshi Jain

At the heart of the ancient city of Nagaur, one of the first Muslim strongholds in northern India is the fort of Ahhichatragarh, built in the early 12th century and repeatedly altered over subsequent centuries. The project for its rehabilitation, involving the training of many artisanal craftsmen, adhered to principles of minimum intervention.

Materials and construction methods of an earlier era were rediscovered, paintings and architectural features conserved, and the historic pattern of access through seven successive gates re-created. The finding and restoration of the intricate water system was a highlight: 90 fountains are now running in the gardens and buildings, where none were functional at the project’s outset. The fort’s buildings and spaces, both external and internal, serve as venue, stage and home to the Sufi Music Festival.

Images of the project:

Nagaur Fort Restoration - Minakshi Jain
Aerial View
Nagaur Fort Rehabilitation - Minakshi Jain
Abha Mahal after conservation
Nagaur Fort Rehabilitation - Minakshi Jain
Rectangular Baradari
Nagaur Fort Rehabilitation - Minakshi Jain
Bhakt Singh Mahal at night
Bhakt Singh Mahal at night
Nagaur Sufi festival
Nagaur Fort Rehabilitation - Minakshi Jain
Nagaur Sufi festival
Nagaur Fort Rehabilitation - Minakshi Jain
Lighting of palace

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